Paleo Banana Bread

Mom and I find a lot of good recipes, but  the ones we really love are those you could  serve to a non-Paleo person without warning them, and they wouldn’t know the difference between the Paleo and the non-Paleo.  It was really  incredible to find a banana bread that we could swap for grain-filled bread without being sad about it. To be frank, I didn’t think it was possible. I’ve had gluten-free banana bread before, vegan and therefore Paleo, and I’ve not liked it. The same goes for cookies and cakes. So, I’m always a little nervous when we try something from those categories.

Just like the chocolate cake and the chocolate chip cookies you’ll find among these recipes, this banana bread is fantastic. You’d never know anything was “alternative” in it. ​Mom found the recipe on a site called Paleo Running Mama, and you can find the original, un-tweaked recipe here.

4 small to medium overripe bananas, mashed well
4 large eggs at room temperature
2 teaspoons vanilla
¼ cup coconut oil, melted and cooled to almost room temperature
1 ¾ cups almond flour
½ cup tapioca flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon fine grain sea salt
¼ cup chopped pecans
¼ cup mini chocolate chips

1. Whisk together dry ingredients and set aside

2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a medium loaf pan with parchment

3. In a large bowl, mix together the eggs and mashed bananas. Add the vanilla and coconut oil and combine well.

4. Slowly stir in dry ingredients. Do not use an electric mixer. Mixing too well can cause the bread not to rise. Moisten until no flour is visible

5. Stir in pecans and chocolate chips

6. Transfer batter to parchment-lined loaf pan and bake for 60 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in them middle of the loaf comes out clean. Place pan on cooling rack and leave bread in pan until it is almost completely cooled. While bread is still warm to the touch, tip it out upside down onto the rack and remove the parchment. Slice when cooled.

7. Enjoy.

This bread will be very moist, particularly toward the middle. These slices are wonderful pan-fried and served hot with toppings. The bread can be stored at room temperatures for twenty-four hours, but should be refrigerated if it lasts any longer than that.

Silk Dark Chocolate Almond Milk

Once upon a time I ate several small meals over the course of the day because that’s what my schedule allowed or even demanded. A few bites here and there between the schedules of two full-time jobs, and I was good. A lot of my meals tended to be the same things every day, and many of the items under the “Favorite Things” tab helped me through the day. One of my end of day favorites was a single-sized dark chocolate almond milk by Silk and a banana.

I’m not a huge almond milk fan. Not to just drink it, at any rate. I will cook with it, have it as ice cream, etc., but I will never just sit and have a glass or cup of milk. Unless it’s the chocolate stuff. I’m picky that way.

I like this particular product because it tastes like the cow-made stuff and have a good regular texture rather than being watery. I occasionally get a little bit of a craving for something “creamy,” and this is something that is a great substitute for a cup of two-percent milk and too many scoops of Quick chocolate powder.

The single-sized servings do not have to be refrigerated, which makes it convenient to take with me on trips or chores. It looks like a little carton of kid’s milk, complete with straw, so drinking it is easy. They can be pricy — nearly seven dollars for six servings — but all almond milk tends to be a little pricy. These little servings, though, especially chilled, feel like a treat. Yes, they have a little sugar in them, but really, if you’re Paleo, you’re not cheating when you drink them. It just feels like it.